The Miseducation of the Doodle

The teacher who chastised you for “mindless doodling” was wrong on both counts. Far from shutting down the mind, the act of doodling engages the brain in the kind of visual sense-making people have practiced for over 30,000 years. Doodling sharpens concentration, increases retention, and enhances access to the problem solving unconscious. It activates the portions of the visual cortex that allow us to see mental imagery and manipulate concepts, and unifies three major learning modalities—visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. Doodle Revolution leader Sunni Brown introduces strategic doodling and presents the ABCs of our shared visual alphabet. Bookmark It Hide Sites

Sketching: the Visual Thinking Power Tool

You don’t have to be a great singer to write a great song—just ask Bob Dylan. Likewise, you needn’t be a Leonardo to draw your way to more and better ideas. Sketching helps you generate concepts quickly, exploring alternatives rapidly and at no cost of resources. The looseness of a sketch removes inhibitions, granting clients and colleagues permission to consider and challenge the ideas it represents. Mike Rohde outlines the practice, surveys the tools, and shares ways to become confident with this method of brainstorming, regardless of your level of artistic ability. Bookmark It Hide Sites

A Simpler Page

Want to design a book? There are mountains of beautifully designed examples to inspire you. But what about digital books? How do you create elegantly typeset, gloriously balanced reading experiences when tablets render type differently and support different fonts, text can extend in every direction, and type can change size? Craig Mod (Flipboard, Art Space Tokyo) addresses these questions and presents the initial release of Bibliotype, an HTML baseline typography library for tablet reading. Bookmark It Hide Sites

Design Criticism and the Creative Process

In every design project, at some point we quit what we’re doing and share our unfinished work with colleagues or clients. This begs the question: Just what does the critique do for the design and the rest of the project? Do critiques really help and are they necessary? If so, how do we use their inconsistencies to improve our creative output? Cassie McDaniel explores how critiques can help us navigate complex processes and projects and collaborate effectively to create original and engaging work. Bookmark It Hide Sites